English Corner – Using Prefixes -Un, -In, -Il to Begin Words

“Unbeknownst to most English learners, the English language has multiple ways of changing a word’s meaning just by adding a few letters to the beginning of the word itself.”

When you are looking to improve your English vocabulary by knowing how to create a negative or neutral meaning, you should consider the usage of changing words by adding -Un, -In, -Il to the beginning of each word to change the actual meaning of it. Unbeknownst to most English learners, the English language has multiple ways of changing a word’s meaning just by adding a few letters to the beginning of the word itself.

In this ‘English Corner’ post, I am going to go over specific examples of how to change these words and their meaning with -Un, -In, -Il although there are other ways to do that. I’ll save more of these word beginnings for another article but let’s get started with these three I’ve listed above.

To get started, let us look at -Un to change English words. There are several words that adding -un to the beginning of would change how we see that particular word. Here below I will list a few words that -un can be added to and how the meaning of the word changes as a result.

  • Unequal (Not equal, not the same)
  • Unavailable (Not available, not ready, not accessible)
  • Untamed (Not controllable, too wild, or crazy)
  • Unimaginable (Not to be imagined, not possible)
  • Unbelievable (Defies belief, similar to Unreal)

As you can see from the examples provided, putting -Un in front of the words listed negated things being equal, people being available, animals being tamed, events being believed, etc. If you look at -Un, it is often negative or neutral in its connotation. There are also a lot of similarities between words like Unreal, Unimaginable, Unbelievable, etc. so you can be sure that you can use -Un before multiple words and have the meaning be similar or the same even if the rest of the word is different.

Let’s continue with another word beginner known as -In, which is more neutral than negative but is not at all positive in terms of its total word when you add it as a syllable to beginning of any word. To use a quick example, adding -In to ‘different’ would make the actual meaning to indicate that you are neutral or not caring about one outcome or another. If you are indifferent to someone or something, then you are neutral to that someone or something and could care less about what is going on for the rest of that sentence or expression.

This tends to be the case with other words that start with -In as well and I will point out each of their meanings to be similar in terms of overall neutrality or indifference below in the list for -In words.

  • Inarticulate (Unable to be understood, confusing)
  • Inhospitable (Not comfortable, lack of good accommodations)
  • Intolerant (Not fair to others, prejudiced, not accepting)
  • Indisposed (Not available, out of commission or service)
  • Insupportable (Not able to provide justification, lack of support or effort given)

Given these examples for -In, you can see that a lot of the words are not just neutral but also negative as well. -Un words tend to be wholly negative in almost all definitions while -In words tend to be a mix of neutral and/or negative in their meanings. Still, being able to add an -In to ‘supportable’, ‘tolerant’ ‘hospitable’ will make your vocabulary that much better by being able to know the difference in English with how to make a word become negative if needed rather than just positive in its meaning when you consider the meanings of words such as ‘tolerant’, ‘supportable’ or ‘hospitable.’

Lastly, while -In and -Un are similar, you cannot make up words where you change the -In for -Un or vice versa. If you change them, they will not be grammatically correct even if the meaning does not change. You must be sure that you do not put an -Un in front of ‘Articulate’ by accident or a ‘In’ in front of ‘Imaginable.’ To master this kind of vocabulary, you should encourage yourself to make a list of English words that begin specifically with -In as well as words that specifically begin with -Un too to not make silly mistakes when it comes time to write them in sentence or use them in conversation.

To finish off with the last of the word beginners, -Il is a commonly used one similar to -In or -Un to negate a word or convey a serious issue or problem that can arise before the main word itself. For example, ‘legal’ means something in society is permissible and can be done without error or penalty. If you put an ‘Il’ in front of that word, then you are forbidden to take that action or do that thing in society, or you will face the consequences if you are found to be guilty of that action. ‘Illegal’ means what is not permissible by law while ‘Legal’ is the opposite in that it is an action that is permitted by the society in question, and which does not carry any punishment such as a fine or imprisonment.

Let us look at other examples where ‘Il’ when placed at the beginning of an English word has a similar effect that ‘Illegal’ would have when it is placed together.

  • Illegitimate (not authorized by law or not in agreement with rules or standards)
  • Illiterate (Not able to read or understand how to write)
  • Illogical (Not comprehensible, without logic or reason)
  • Illusive (Not able to be captured, contained, or deceptive by nature)
  • Illiberal (Undemocratic, authoritative, unprogressive)

Not every word beginning with -Il will have a negative or neutral meaning but there are a lot of them which will change the meaning of the main word to have the opposite meaning after it is written. -Il, like -Un or -In, carries the weight of making words that much different just by changing the beginning of the word with those two letters.

For the average English learner, having lists of the vocabulary words that begin with either -un, -in, or -il is an important step towards improving your knowledge in this proficiency area. Once you understand how the meaning of the word(s) change as a result, you can then be able to use it yourself in a sentence, either spoken or written. Once you memorize the words, the meanings, and the context, you will be well on your way to becoming that much more proficiency in the English language. There are other word beginners to cover besides these three important ones so be sure to check out another article in the future, which will cover this topic within English vocabulary.

English Corner – Showing Compassion and Kindness with Words

“When you learn English as a Second Language, your vocabulary to express kindness, compassion, and understanding towards others should be a top priority.”

One of the key parts of English vocabulary that a new learner to the language should focus on is to how to be compassionate and kind to other people. When you learn English as a Second Language, your vocabulary to express kindness, compassion, and understanding towards others should be a top priority. Expressing kindness in English or in any language will get you very far with other native speakers and can help you in any situation. When you do your best to treat others in ways that they would like to be treated such as with kindness and respect, you will likely not run into any serious conflicts or issues. There may be misunderstandings and ‘lost in translation’ moments but if you are able to make amends for it with your English vocabulary, you will be forgiven by other people and they’ll often give you a second chance.

To give you some ideas, I’m going to break this article down into two parts. I will begin with compassion, which means showing sympathy and concern for other people who may be going through a rough time or having issues in their life. There are multiple ways to express compassion in the English language and I’m going to give examples of both words, phrases, and sentences that express compassion clearly and deeply. When you are compassionate towards other people without expecting anything in return, that is truly what it means to be a mature human being who is also emotionally intelligent.

Words of Compassion:

  • Feeling
  • Empathy
  • Remorse
  • Sorrow
  • Forgiveness
  • Regret
  • Mercy
  • Benevolence
  • Sympathy
  • Mercy

Phrases of Compassion:

  • Feel better soon!
  • Wish you well!
  • Things will get better!
  • Stay positive!
  • I hear you!
  • I’m with you!
  • I am so sorry!
  • Please forgive me!
  • I didn’t mean to!
  • Will you forgive me?

Sentences of Compassion:

  • I am sorry if I hurt you in any way.
  • I didn’t mean to cause you any pain or sorrow.
  • I feel a lot of remorse for what I did and hope you can forgive me someday.
  • Please know that I am thinking of you and your family in these tough times.
  • My thoughts and prayers are with you all.
  • I did not mean to cause you any harm or any offense. If I did, I am very sorry.
  • I would like to ask for your forgiveness.
  • Please have mercy on me as I did not mean any wrongdoing.
  • I hear where you are coming from and see that what I did was wrong.
  • Please know that you have my deepest sympathies in these difficult times.

Showing compassion in English is all about having empathy for another person whether you were right or wrong. It means showing emotions that are genuine, which may lead to someone forgiving you or seeing your point of view, but it will definitely show that you are a mature person who is capable of admitting their mistakes and seeking forgiveness rather than being stubborn about it.

When it comes to kindness, it always goes a long way whether it is made up of individual words, a few words, or in complete sentences. Showing kindness will open up more doors for you in the English language than any other kind of vocabulary. However, it must be earnest, it must be done without expectation of return, and it must be consistently used in your daily usage of the language. Without kindness, you will not be able to fully utilize English and it is unlikely you’ll be able to learn other vocabulary within the language itself. When you have kindness in your personal vocabulary, everything else will come shortly after and other English speakers will be willing to help you out so that you will become a better learner and keep being a better person.

Words of Kindness:

  • Patient
  • Understanding
  • Pleasant
  • Nice
  • Generous
  • Charitable
  • Humane
  • Decent
  • Warm-Hearted
  • Altruistic

Phrases of Kindness:

  • I’ll help you.
  • Let me assist you.
  • How are you?
  • You look well.
  • Do you feel good?
  • How have you been?
  • I’m here to help.
  • How’s your family?
  • Give my best to him/her.
  • My house is your house.
  • Thank you very much.
  • Excuse me.
  • Please!
  • I appreciate it.

Sentences of Kindness:

  • I am here to help you and your family.
  • I’m giving to charity because I think it’s a worthy cause.
  • I would like to volunteer on the weekends because it’s the right thing to do.
  • Helping people out is the best way to make someone else’s day.
  • I enjoy getting out of my seat on the bus to give it to an elderly person.
  • Giving back to others without expecting anything in return is true generosity.
  • Before you do anything else in your day, you should be kind first.
  • My job is to help people with their luggage as a doorman and it makes my day.
  • I’m cleaning out the trash in the neighborhood park because I care about my community.
  • Before you criticize the world around you, think about how you can make it better with simple kindness.

With Kindness and Compassion, you can go far in this world in any language but especially with the English language. I believe it is truly important to have this post as a separate article because before you dive into any other type of English vocabulary, you should be willing to learn the basics of being kind and compassionate and to use it as much as you can. I promise you will not regret it and you’ll be much better off for studying this particular kind of English vocabulary.

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